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endocrine disruptors

Everything You Should Know About Endocrine Disruptors, 2022

Endocrine disruptors are everywhere, but very little is known about them in the mainstream.

Everything You Should Know About Endocrine Disruptors

Endocrine disruptors have simply become a fact of life since the second half of the Twentieth Century.

They can be categorized into two major sections: unnatural and natural.

Unnatural endocrine disruptors include things like plastics and herbicides; natural endocrine disruptors will include phytoestrogens.

Unnatural Endocrine Disruptors

Xenoestrogens

Xenoestrogens have surfaced on the internet as something to be avoided at all costs; but what are xenoestrogens and why are they bad?

As part of a recent series, in advance of our new book Reclaim Your Masculinity, we have been examining what testosterone (T) is and does, why T levels are falling across the developed world and what you can do – the foods you should avoid and the foods you should eat – to begin to restore your proper hormonal balance and with it your precious masculinity. 

Let there be no doubt: the modern world is waging a war against masculinity, both at the social and the molecular level. Putting the social level to one side, at the molecular level today’s man is caught in a ruthless two-pronged assault from natural estrogenic foods and industrially produced estrogenic chemicals. 

We have already examined the role of phytoestrogens, naturally occurring compounds that mimic the effects of estrogen, the female hormone, in the human body. Hops, for instance, which have been used to preserve beer for hundreds of years, are actually one of the most potent estrogen-mimicking compounds known to man. 

But what about xenoestrogens?

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Xenoestrogens Under The Microscope

Now it’s the turn of xenestrogens, a diverse class of industrial compounds that also mimic the effects of estrogen. What’s more, these chemicals are so ubiquitous that it’s much harder to avoid them than the naturally occurring compounds in your diet. 

But why does this matter? Why is having low T such a bad thing?

T is the hormone most associated with masculinity, and although it’s also important to women’s bodies and their health, the increased levels of T in the male body are responsible for the host of traits that make men men, rather than women. 

Xenoestrogens interfere with the endocrine systems of both sexes.

Body hair, muscle mass, bone density, strength, aggression, dominance and competitiveness – increases in all of these things are associated with increased T in men. 

It’s worth noting that falling T levels are a fact of life for all men as they age; unless you take exogenous T, it’s as unavoidable as taxes and death, I’m afraid. After the age of 30, a man can expect to lose 1% of his T every year for the rest of his life. 

But the natural reduction all men can expect to suffer pales in comparison with the society-wide collapse in T levels that has occurred over the second half of the twentieth and the first quarter of the twenty-first century.

Men today have considerably less T than men of the same age even a single generation ago. 

A 2007 study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism showed a significant reduction in the T levels of men since the 1980s. A 60-year-old American man in 2004, for example, had 17% less testosterone than a 60-year-old American man in 1987.

These findings were corroborated in a study of Danish men, who displayed a two-digit decline between the 1920s and the 1960s.

Apart from taking a blood test to establish whether you have low T, there are various symptoms you’ll experience if you have low T.

The main symptoms include:

  • Reduced libido
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Fertility problems (inability to conceive)
  • Fatigue

Boys with low T may develop slower, with little or no body hair, under-developed muscles and smaller penises; and men with low T will have difficulty building muscle, no matter how hard they try.

In extreme cases of low T, usually referred to as hypogonadism, men may also develop breast tissue (gynecomastia) and osteoporosis (reduced bone density).

Hypogonadism has a variety of causes, which include:

  • Certain genetic disorders
  • HIV
  • Pituitary disorders, including pituitary tumours and injuries
  • Inflammatory diseases
  • Obesity and also rapid weight loss
  • Nutritional deficiencies
  • Steroid use

Obesity, in particular, is an increasingly common cause of hypogonadism. We will later discuss the interrelation between xenoestrogens and fat, plus the vicious cycle xenoestrogens set into motion.

Enter Xenoestrogens

xenoestrogens structure
xenoestrogens structure

So where do xenestrogens come in?
Alex Jones Just “Came Out” as a Gay Frog, and It's Amazing | David Gee

If the general public, at least in the US, know anything about xenestrogens, it’s likely to be as a result of the Alex Jones ‘gay frog’ meme. In 2015, during one of his many lengthy rants, after discussing the US military’s supposed development of a ‘gay bomb’ to make enemy combatants make love (with each other) and not war, Jones uttered the now immortal line, ‘I don’t like ‘em putting chemicals in the water that turn the frickin’ frogs gay!’

Lost among the mockery and viral memes, including a parody indie folk song, was the fact that there really are chemicals in the water that make amphibians and fish change their gender. These chemicals are xenestrogens and among the worst of them is atrazine, a pesticide which is banned in the EU but continues to be used in US.

The endocrine-disrupting (i.e. hormone-disrupting) effects of atrazine in living creatures have been well-established for some time [R].

A study showed that atrazine exposure could not only chemically castrate male frogs, but also cause adult frogs to change their gender completely [R].

In 2006, a statement was made before the House Committee on Government Reform about the increasing number of male fish observed to be bearing eggs in the Potomac River [R].

The study [R] noted:

‘Current research on intersexual characteristics has related numerous chemicals to reproductive effects in fish. These chemicals, often termed “endocrine disruptors’ include previously banned chemicals, such as DDT and chlordane, natural and anthropogenic hormones, herbicides, fungicides, industrial chemicals, and an emerging group of chemicals including personal care products and pharmaceuticals that may act as endocrine disruptors in fish as well as other organisms.’ 

And added that:

‘Potential sources of these endocrine disruptors include agricultural, as well as individual use of herbicides and pesticides, human waste (discharges from wastewater treatment facilities and individual home septic systems), animal wastes that may reach the aquatic environment through runoff, leachates from landfills, and even atmospheric deposition.’

In 1999, a US Geological Survey investigation showed that such chemicals could be found in 80% of all streams that were sampled nationwide.

Of course, the damage to aquatic ecosystems is bad enough, but it’s not just amphibian and fish species that are affected. Humans are affected directly by these chemicals too (as well as indirectly, since they may cause ecosystem-level collapses in human food sources if fish and amphibians cannot reproduce properly).

Some of the most commonly encountered xenestrogenic chemicals, and their sources (in brackets), are:

  • 4MBC (in sun lotion)
  • Hydroxy-anisole butyrate (a food preservative)
  • Bisphenol-A (a food preservative and plasticiser)
  • Dieldrin (a pesticide)
  • DDT (a pesticide. Although it is banned in the US, it is used in countries that export food to the US)
  • Erythrosine (a red dye)
  • PCB (in lubricants, adhesives and paints)
  • P-nonylphenol (in PVC and by-products from detergents and spermicide)
  • Parabens (in lotions)
  • Pthalates (in plastics)
Xenoestrogens
Xenoestrogens list

Yes, that’s right: not only is the spermicide in the condom you’ve used killing the sperm you’ve just released, it may also be making it harder for your body to produce fertile sperm in the first place! 

Aren’t Xenoestrogens wonderful?

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A number of studies of exposure to the chemical diethylstilbestrol (DES) have concluded that it is responsible for testicular cancer and malformation of the genitals. Indeed, prenatal exposure to an increasing variety of xenestrogens is hypothesised to be behind the massive rise of testicular cancer since 1975 [R].

Studies of pthalates have shown that prenatal exposure may cause feminisation of baby boys and be responsible for smaller penis size — another potential side effect of xenoestrogens [R].

Pthalates were first introduced on a wide scale during the 1950s, when PVC became readily available. They are used to increase plastic flexibility, and as a result have a myriad of applications: in food containers, water bottles and children’s toys, as well as foams, solvents, perfumes, pesticides, nail polish, adhesives and lubricants.

Of course, industries with interests in the manufacture and use of xenestrogenic chemicals have argued that they display effects at a much weaker level than naturally occurring estrogenic compounds; this makes it harder, so they say, for these xenestrogens to compete in the body and cause estrogenic effects [R]. 

The truth is, though, that there is already significant evidence to show that xenestrogens do mimic estrogen in the bodies of living creatures, including humans, readily binding to receptors and inducing rapid effects [R] [R] [R].

It’s worth noting that all of the other side effects associated with increased estrogenic activity are to be expected as a result of exposure to these chemicals, and that includes increased body fat and metabolic disorders — one of the main reasons why xenoestrogens have been targeted by the fitness community.

The weight gain, in particular, can become a vicious cycle. Within the body, estrogen synthesis takes place in the fatty tissue. The fatty tissue produces the aromatase enzyme, which in turn converts androgen (male) hormones into estrogen.

In the past, we have spoken about the estrogenicity of fat; xenoestrogens plunge you into a frustrating and emasculating vicious cycle.

Xenestrogens bind to estrogen receptors in fat tissue, inducing aromatisation and leading to the production of more estrogen. In turn, this increases fat tissue – leading to further estrogen production, and so on and so on. What began as exposure to xenestrogenic or phytoestrogenic compounds can soon become a weight-gain cascade.

So what’s the answer? How can you reduce your exposure to these xenoestrogenic chemicals? Here are some simple tips.

  • Install a reverse osmosis water filter with an activated carbon filter for your drinking water
  • Choose organic, locally grown, seasonal food
  • Always wash properly and peel fruit and vegetables that are non-organic
  • Buy the highest quality meat and dairy products you can: aim for local, organic, pasture-raised products
  • Reduce your reliance on plastics, including water bottles, canned foods, non-stick cookware and plastic wrappings

Clearly, this may involve a serious change to habits and some expense, but take it from us: the immediate cost will be far less than the cost of slow-burning chemical castration via xenoestrogrens, not just for you but for the generations that come after you as well. https://www.youtube.com/embed/uDstLG9TUFo?feature=oembedIFBB Pro talks xenoestrogens and epigeneticshttps://www.youtube.com/embed/BIvHrC_mS_M?feature=oembedA xenoestrogen discussion of food plastics

Microplastics

Microplastics have been the subject of negative press in the last few years. Recent studies found microplastics in the placentas of unborn babies, causing ample concern among scientists.

Plastic not so fantasticour seas and oceans have become a plastic graveyard

The ocean is swimming in plastic and it's getting worse – we need connected  global policies now

We’ve all seen the images. Our beautiful seas and oceans defiled by vast quantities of single-use plastic. The enormous artificial reefs of trash. Seabirds ensnared in plastic beer can rings. The rotting corpse of a sea turtle suspended in a web of plastic netting. The contents of a sperm whale’s stomach: 100kg of assorted plastic – nets, ropes, bags, straps, cups and bottles. The list goes on…

A sperm whale found stranded on the Isle of Harris, Scotland Whale with stomach open

had 100kg of plastic in its stomach 

While much of the focus, rightly, is on the massive quantity of visible pieces of plastic waste that are clogging our seas and oceans and strangling its inhabitants, as well as on noble endeavours to reduce it, such as Boyan Slat’s Ocean Cleanup company, the truth is that the problem of plastic pollution extends well beyond the visible. 

The phenomenon of microplastics, literally microscopic pieces of plastic, is now generating increasing awareness, as we learn more about their ubiquity in our seas and oceans and also their growing presence in the food chain. The long-term effects of microplastics on humans and animals are as yet largely unknown, but they are unlikely to be good.

Table of Contents

What Are Microplastics

Microplastics of a larger variety

Microplastics have been found in drinking water, the food we eat and the air we breathe.

Microplastics, as the name suggests, are simply very small pieces of plastic. While some microplastics are still visible to the naked eye, as in the picture above, some – perhaps the vast majority – are not. Generally, the classification is any piece of plastic below 5mm in size.

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Microplastics are further categorised into primary and secondary microplastics. Primary microplastics are manufactured as microplastics, meaning they are designed to be the size they are. These include microbeads, which are often used in beauty products, nurdles (small pellets) and clothing fibres. It is estimated that a single washing cycle can cause synthetic clothing fibres to shed as many as 700, 000 fibres. [R]

Secondary microplastics, by contrast, are created through the breakdown of larger pieces of plastics, which can occur as a result of UV rays from the sun, and the action of wind and waves. A piece of polystyrene, perhaps a takeaway food carton, might break down into tiny pieces over time as it sits on the beach, under the action of the sun, sea and wind.

Microplastics in the Food Chain and in Human Bodies

The human placenta, now a known home to microplastics

Eating the placenta: would you like yours raw, medium or well done? |  Motherhood in prehistory

In December 2020, to the shock of the researchers and the mothers who took part, a study revealed that microplastics had been discovered in the placentas of unborn babies. [R] The particles were found in the placentas of four women who had otherwise normal pregnancies, and were discovered on both sides of the placenta (that is, on the maternal side and the foetal side, as well as in the membrane within which the foetus develops). 

Only a small piece of each placenta was examined, suggesting that many more particles were present than were actually found. All of the particles had been dyed, suggesting that they had come from packaging, paints, personal care products or cosmetics. The mothers may have either consumed the plastic or inhaled it. Yes, that’s right: there are microplastics in the air. In fact, in one study, of airborne dust, 4% of all particles the researchers found were plastic. So that’s just under 1/20 of all the airborne dust. [R]
Withered Wojak | Know Your Meme

TFW you learn about airborne microplastics

What’s more, the particles were small enough – 10 microns or 0.01mm – to enter the bloodstream. It is entirely possible, then, that microplastics had been transferred into the babies’ blood; although the researchers did not investigate this.

As shocking as this is, it’s totally consistent with what we have come to know in recent years about the ubiquity of microplastics. Microplastics in rain. [R] Microplastics in Arctic ice. [R] Microplastics in fish and fruit and vegetables. [R] [R] Microplastics in drinking water and waste waster. [R] [R] Microplastics are everywhere. So what does this mean?

Microplastics: Health Implications

Microplastics Are Killing Baby Fish, New Study Finds - EcoWatch

A baby fish full of microplastic balls

We already know that the actual physical effects of consuming microplastics can be deadly for many species of animal. Fish, for instance, are being killed because some varieties seem to prefer eating microplastics to their normal food sources, effectively starving them. Baby fish are especially vulnerable. [R]

The implications for humans are less clear, beyond the possible contribution of microplastics to declining fish stocks and the collapse of marine ecosystems and the knock-on effects of this for us; but we can still speculate about what effects these microplastics might be having in the human body as well. 

In our article on xenoestrogens, we considered the role of pthalates, in particular, to endocrine (i.e. hormonal) disruption in humans and other animals. Pthalates were first introduced on a wide scale during the 1950s, when PVC became readily available. They are used to increase plastic flexibility, and as a result have a myriad of applications: in food containers, water bottles and children’s toys, as well as foams, solvents, perfumes, pesticides, nail polish, adhesives and lubricants. Studies of pthalates have shown that prenatal exposure may cause feminisation of baby boys and be responsible for smaller penis size. [R]

Given that many if not all of these microplastics will have been treated with such substances, we can imagine that they might also act as vectors for them to enter the human body, with disruptive effects. Just how great these effects might be remains to be seen, and requires urgent research.

We do already have a number of studies on the effects of microplastics on marine life, and the findings are as dire as you might expect. In one study of female fish, the researchers found that the microplastics caused tissue damage, disrupted production of reproductive and sex-specific hormones including 17β-estradiol and testosterone and had noticeable cross-generational effects, stunting the growth of newborn fish, as well as increasing the incubation period and decreasing the rate of hatching. [R] Other studies have documented liver toxicity and various other pathologies in marine life. [R] [R]

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What Can Be Done?

Brendan Fraser before and after he learned about microplastics

Although there are ways to reduce your potential exposure to microplastics, it’s unlikely that you’re going to be able to do so totally, at least while remaining in the modern world. Even if fish and shellfish are the main route from the foodchain into humans, microplastics have been found in non-marine food sources including chicken, honey and beer. Bottled water is another major contributor; in fact, it may be a much greater contributor of microplastics than any quantity of fish you are likely to eat. [R]

One thing you can do, as we urged in our article on xenoestrogens is to start reducing your reliance on plastic – NOW! That includes water bottles, canned foods, non-stick cookware and plastic wrappings. You can also choose natural fibres such as wool and cotton over synthetic fibres, install a reverse osmosis water filter with an activated carbon filter for your drinking water and aim to but organic, locally grown or raised food.

But until researchers can come up with a way to scrub our environment of these harmful little pellets, we’re just going to have to accept that we’re all part-plastic these days.

Atrazine

Atrazine is bad news. If you’re meme-savvy, you’ll probably know that it is behind what is making the frogs… well, if you know, you know.

You’ve probably heard of Monsanto’s Roundup and its principal chemical glyphosate, which has already been linked to cancer and is banned in many countries. But what about Atrazine, the second-most common herbicide in use in the United States after Roundup? Atrazine is probably as dangerous as Roundup, in particular as an endocrine-disrupting chemical. We’ve already warned about endocrine disruptors in our dedicated article on xenoestrogens, and also in numerous articles about the approaching fertility apocalypse and tanking testosterone levels of most men in the developed world.

What is Atrazine?

atrazine

Atrazine is a herbicide produced by Syngenta A.G., a company based in Switzerland. It has been in use in the United States since 1958. Although it is now banned in the Europe Union, after a 2004 investigation which found groundwater levels exceeding those set by regulators, it remains legal in the US, where it is used in massive quantities, especially in certain crop-producing regions.

Annually, around 70 million lbs of Atrazine is used in the US. Around 90% of this ocean of herbicide is used to kill weeds in corn fields, especially in the Midwest region. The remaining 10% is used on sugarcane, sorghum, macadamia nuts, soybeans, schools, parks, playgrounds, guava, athletic fields and evergreen farms. Atrazine is also an ingredient of around 200 other farming and landscaping products on the market.

Notice the massive concentration of Atrazine use in the corn belt (Midwest)

When glyphosate was developed, it was hoped that this would lead to the phasing out of Atrazine use. Unfortunately, as crops grew resistant to glyphosate, this didn’t happen, and now weeds are often subjected to an ultra-toxic cocktail of glyphosate and Atrazine for greater effectiveness.


(9) GMO Advocate Says Monsanto’s Roundup Safe to Drink, Then Refuses Glass – YouTubehttps://www.youtube.com/embed/QWM_PgnoAtA?feature=oembed

Of course, chemicals sprayed on crops tend not to stay on the crops or in the ground where they’re sprayed; if only things were that simple! Instead, these chemicals, including Atrazine and glyphosate, are washed into rivers and lakes and also find their way into human drinking water. 

In fact, Atrazine is found in 94% of all drinking water tested by the USDA, more than any other pesticide. An estimated seven million people were exposed to Atrazine between 1998 and 2003 through their drinking water.


The highest levels of groundwater contamination are, as we might expect, in the Midwest, where it is used the most. There is a seasonal aspect to contamination, with USGS monitoring showing that drinking water concentrations typically spike during the spring and early summer as rains flush the freshly applied herbicide into streams and from there into local drinking water supplies.

So why is this such a bad thing?

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Atrazine: an endocrine-disrupting chemical

https://youtube.com/watch?v=22C5EGXpD5Y%3Ffeature%3Doembed

I don’t remember this conversation in Metal Gear Solid 2…

Atrazine is not a chemical that kills or makes it effects known quickly. Rather, it works by a more insidious process of hormonal disruption, causing chemical castration and various dreadful reproductive effects. Evidence for the cancer-causing potential of Atrazine is also growing steadily. Here we’ll focus on the endocrine-disrupting, or xenoestrogenic, effects in particular.

If the general public, at least in the US, know anything about xenestrogens, it’s likely to be as a result of the Alex Jones ‘gay frog’ meme. In 2015, during one of his many lengthy rants, after discussing the US military’s supposed development of a ‘gay bomb’ to make enemy combatants make love (with each other) and not war, Jones uttered the now immortal line, ‘I don’t like ‘em putting chemicals in the water that turn the frickin’ frogs gay!’

Lost among the mockery and viral memes, including a parody indie folk song, was the fact that there really are chemicals in the water that make amphibians and fish change their gender. These chemicals are xenestrogens, chemicals that mimic the effects of the natural hormone estrogen, and among the worst of them is Atrazine. Its endocrine-disrupting effects have been well-established for some time.

In 2006, a statement was made before the House Committee on Government Reform about the increasing number of male fish observed to be bearing eggs in the Potomac River.


The study noted:

‘Current research on intersexual characteristics has related numerous chemicals to reproductive effects in fish. These chemicals, often termed “endocrine disruptors’ include previously banned chemicals, such as DDT and chlordane, natural and anthropogenic hormones, herbicides, fungicides, industrial chemicals, and an emerging group of chemicals including personal care products and pharmaceuticals that may act as endocrine disruptors in fish as well as other organisms.’ 

Adding that:

‘Potential sources of these endocrine disruptors include agricultural, as well as individual use of herbicides and pesticides, human waste (discharges from wastewater treatment facilities and individual home septic systems), animal wastes that may reach the aquatic environment through runoff, leachates from landfills, and even atmospheric deposition.’

A study showed that Atrazine exposure could not only chemically castrate male frogs, but also cause adult frogs to change their gender completely

Of course, the damage to aquatic ecosystems is bad enough, but it’s not just amphibian and fish species that are affected. Humans are affected directly by these chemicals too (as well as indirectly, since they may cause ecosystem-level collapses in human food sources if fish and amphibians cannot reproduce properly). Other studies have shown links to increased risk of miscarriagereduced male fertilitylow birth weightincreased risk of birth defects across the board and higher incidence of abdominal defects.

All in all, together with the witches’ brew of other toxic xenoestrogenic chemicals we are exposed to in increasing concentrations on a daily basis, we could be facing a situation in which mankind finds itself unable to reproduce without scientific intervention within the next 25 years. Yes. Really. By 2045, the majority of men could be totally unable to produce sperm, with the remainder producing amounts that render them functionally infertile too.https://www.youtube.com/embed/316Qi6H9d1Q?feature=oembed

So what can you do to protect yourself against Atrazine exposure? Three of the easiest things to do are:

  1. Install a reverse-osmosis water filter with a carbon filter for your drinking water.
  2. Choose organic, locally grown, seasonal food
  3. Always wash properly and peel fruit and vegetables that are non-organic

Glyphosate

In a new book out now, an academic examines the toxic effects of the weedkiller Glyphosate, hundreds of millions of lbs of which are used every year. She even claims that Glyphosate is becoming aerosolised through the use of biodiesel and that this may be responsible for many of the worst effects of the Coronavirus pandemic. Here we examine some of the most common claims about the negative health effects of the chemical.

See the source image

In her new book, Toxic Legacy: How the Weedkiller Glyphosate is Destroying Our Health and the Environment, Stephanie Seneff describes the terrible ongoing effects of decades of massive use of Glyphosate in the US. Glyphosate is the active ingredient in Roundup, the most commonly used herbicide in the world. Nearly 300 million lbs of it are sprayed on farms and food every year.

One of the most eye-catching claims Seneff makes – and one that’s been much-discussed on Twitter in recent weeks – is that biodiesel made from crops sprayed with Glyphosate aerosolises the weedkiller, which is then inhaled. This damages the lungs, and this damage may be playing a role – yes, really – in exacerbating the Coronavirus pandemic. Recently, she discussed these claims as a guest on the Wise Traditions podcast, from the Weston Price Foundation.

McDonald’s makes a lot of noise about its efforts to power its delivery fleets using biodiesel

Aerosolised glyphosate making the Coronavirus pandemic worse!? Could this really be true? Such a striking claim is always likely to attract serious criticism, and Seneff’s claim has not proven the exception to this rule

HSuppz_Thin

Putting aside this headline-grabbing claim, we’ll tell you what Glyphosate is and why, even if it isn’t helping drive the pandemic, it’s still almost certainly a very bad thing.

Glyphosate: What It Is and How It’s Used

Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum herbicide. It can’t be used to kill specific weeds or plants, but instead kills most broadleaf plants in the area it is used. It works by inhibiting the action of a plant enzyme that is needed for the production of three amino acids, which are essential to protein synthesis and growth. This is what kills the plant.

Glyphosate is absorbed into plants mainly through the leaves, and only tiny amounts of it are absorbed via the roots. As a result, glyphosate is only effective at killing growing weeds and grass, and cannot stop seeds from germinating. Once it is absorbed into the plant structure, glyphosate spreads all around the plant, to its roots and leaves. 

In another article, we noted that Glyphosate was first developed by Monsanto as a means to replace the toxic endocrine-disrupting herbicide Atrazine. But that never happened, and now Atrazine and Glyphosate are most commonly used together in an ultra-toxic cocktail; if one chemical won’t kill the weed, the other will.


https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/E76vvoasnRyO54jMArCxhdW3gulGIHXKAB6mrgXjkEYhgKxtuEhaXS3OXz54w72S7OAutxHe648JB-ER3iC0nO5sRuPTg4wawBu14qo83n-txIqbFv3D_HSKVDxJ2cwnIMjiLK4

A map of Atrazine use in 2013. Note the concentration in the Corn Belt (Midwest). In agriculture, Glyphosate is most commonly used as part of a toxic cocktail with Atrazine, so a map of Glyphosate use would look almost identical to this.

Glyphosate is not only used on agricultural land, however. It’s used on public parks, school sports fields and in private gardens, just like Atrazine. And, of course, residues remain in the foods you eat, if they’ve been treated with it, and in the drinking water, as a result of run-off. Glyphosate is chemically stable in water and is not subject to photochemical degradation (i.e. it is not broken down by sunlight).

HSuppz_Thin

The sad truth is that, although you might think you’d be at greatest risk of exposure in agricultural areas like the Midwest where the chemical is used in its greatest concentrations, you can’t really escape Glyphosate. This is the story of life in the modern world when it comes to toxic chemicals, whether we’re talking about Glyphosate, Atrazine or xenoestrogens like pthalates and BPA. Recently, we reported that microplastics, which can carry a toxic freight of xenoestrogens, circulate globally on weather currents and can reach areas where even humans have yet to set foot.

Glyphosate Risks

There’s plenty of disagreement about the nature of the risks of Glyphosate, as you might expect with a commercial product that is worth so much money, directly for the companies that produce it and indirectly for the companies that use it to ensure their harvests.

At the very least, it’s beyond dispute that assessments like the following, taken from verywellhealth.com, are blithe in the extreme.

It’s also disingenuous to place a focus on tiny individual exposures, when the real fear is about repeated exposure over longer periods of time. The danger isn’t that one fast-food meal you ate containing a tiny amount of glyphosate residue, but years and decades of exposure through food, water and the broader environment.

It has been suggested that one method by which Glyphosate builds up in the body is by substitution with the amino acid glycine, so that the chemical is literally embedded in many of the proteins in your body.

One of the most persistent concerns with Glyphosate has been its potential carcinogenic properties from repeated exposure. According to public statements, Bayer Pharmaceuticals, which acquired Monsanto in 2018, is facing 125,000 lawsuits relating to health effects from Glyphosate.

Thousands of consumers have filed Roundup cancer claims alleging they developed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, b-cell lymphoma, leukemia and other forms of cancer after using the weed killer.

The first non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma lawsuit came before a jury in 2018 and resulted in a landmark $289 million verdict against Monsanto. The award has been reduced twice, but the plaintiff, Dewayne Johnson, and his family should receive $20 million.

In 2020, Bayer agreed to a $10.9 billion dollar Roundup settlement, and has since put aside a further $2 billion for future lawsuits. Clearly, the claims are not going to keep coming. 

A number of studies have linked Glyphosate exposure to increased risks of forms of cancer like Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL), in Europe and the United States. A 2019 study from the University of Washington, for instance, concluded that high exposure to Glyphosate increased a person’s risk of NHL by 41%. 

There are other health concerns too, many of which relate to:

We think it’s safe to say that as long as there’s money to be made from Glyphosate, the claims of negative health effects will be disputed.

So what can you do to reduce your exposure? First of all, you can reduce or eliminate entirely all non-organic food from your diet. Processed food, in particular, is likely to contain Glyphosate (see this lab report of a test conducted on five popular products in the US), another reason why it should be avoided at all costs

Even so, you should still wash all fruit and vegetables thoroughly, because cross-contamination can occur in a variety of different ways. 

With regard to meat and meat-products, try to buy from trusted local sources. That way you can be sure not only that the animals are treated kindly but also that they aren’t given feed containing glyphosate. 

Consider installing a reverse-osmosis water filter with a carbon filter for your drinking water.

As we said, though, with regard to xenoestrogens, it may be impossible to reduce your exposure totally. But the more you can remove this potentially carcinogenic chemical and others from your body and environment, the better off you’re likely to be.

BPA

A new study has provided further insight into the negative effects of (BPA) endocrine (ie. hormone)-disrupting chemicals. As well as wreaking havoc with your hormones and fertility, BPA exposure can also make you fat by stimulating receptors that are involved in regulating appetite, leading to overeating.

See the source image

This isn’t a zebrafish. It’s a puffer fish and it isn’t actually fat. 

BPA Fish Study

A new study in the Journal of Hazardous Materials has shown that exposure to BPA, a ubiquitous endocrine disruptor found in plastics, makes zebrafish increase their food intake and put on weight. Endocrine disruptors are now to be found in significant concentrations throughout the global environment, including in drinking water and even the air, and are being blamed for a collapse in fertility that could potentially threaten the future of the human race.

While we’ve already written at length about the hormone-disrupting effects of xenoestrogenic chemicals like BPA and pthalates, this latest study reveals that the negative effects of BPA exposure are not limited to mimicry of the female hormone estrogen.

The effects of exposure to BPA and TBBPA, another similar compound, were examined in the case of zebrafish, through a variety of analytical methods. The researchers found that exposure to these chemicals at levels now commonly found in the environment was enough to induce hyperphagia (overeating) and obesity in adult males. 

See the source image

Now this actually is a zebrafish, and by the looks of it this fish is in pretty good shape

Furthermore, the fish exposed also developed lipid accumulation in the liver (fatty liver). In humans, fatty liver is linked to obesity, diabetes and other forms of disorder characterised by insulin resistance.

After genetic analysis, the researchers concluded that the chemicals were having these effects through activating the CB1 cannabinoid gene.
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Interestingly enough, the cannabinoid receptors are also stimulated by consumption of omega-6-rich vegetable oils, as we discussed in a recent article on why you should be eating butter. The cannabinoid receptors play an extremely important role in governing appetite, and their stimulation by compounds derived from omega-6 fats (endocannabanoids) is thought to be one of many reasons why our current modern diet, which has a surfeit of omega-6, is doing us such harm. 

HSuppz_Thin

In a lab experiment, mice were fed different kinds of fat. Two groups of mice were given different amounts of linoleic acid, a polyunsaturated omega-6 fatty acid that makes up a large percentage of soya, maize and sunflower oils. A third group was put on a diet with a high content of omega-6 that also contained a certain amount of marine omega-3. The results showed that the group given the diet with the most omega-6 ate more and gained considerably more weight than the group on the low-omega-6 diet.

Although this new research took place in an aquatic setting, there’s good reason to believe that the effects would be replicated in humans – that exposure to BPA and TBBPA could induce overeating and weight gain in us too. The estrogenic effects of BPA and other xenoestrogens are experienced by both animals and humans alike.

See the source image

Frogs, reptiles and fish have suffered heavily from the estrogenic effects of chemical residue in water

Given the severity of those estrogenic effects – which can in high enough doses amount to chemical castration – you should already be thinking about reducing your exposure to endocrine-disruptors, without the need for further persuasion. 

Note, though, that in the modern world there is probably no escaping these substances totally. Microplastics, a known vector for them, have been shown to be present in the most remote places on earth, circulating through the global environment like a force of nature.

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Microplastics are now circulating on air currents and can reach places humans have never been.

While that may be so, reducing your exposure as much as possible can go a very long way towards healing your poisoned body and restoring you to prime health. Here are some simple tips to help:

  • Install a reverse osmosis water filter with an activated carbon filter for your drinking water
  • Choose organic, locally grown, seasonal food
  • Always wash properly and peel fruit and vegetables that are non-organic
  • Buy the highest quality meat and dairy products you can: aim for local, organic, pasture-raised products
  • Reduce your reliance on plastics, including water bottles, canned foods, non-stick cookware and plastic wrappings

Clearly, this may involve a serious change to habits and some expense, but take it from us: the immediate cost will be far less than the cost of slow-burning chemical castration – not just for you but for the generations that come after you as well. 

Natural Endocrine Disruptors

Phytoestrogens

You may have heard of phytoestrogens, but what are they? Why are they bad news? Where are they found? How can they be avoided?

In recent weeks, we’ve devoted a lot of time to discussing the estrogenic substances that are waging an all-out war on the bodies of modern men. Although we’ve already written an article on xenoestrogens, and examined individual examples of phytoestrogenic substances – soy and hopped beer especially – we’ve not yet written an article on phytoestrogens. Well, here it is: everything you need to know about phytoestrogens.

Quite simply, phytoestrogens are chemicals that are produced by plants and mimic the effects of the hormone estrogen in the body, in exactly the same manner as xenoestrogens, which are artificial chemicals produced through industrial processes.

Because of their estrogenic properties, plants and herbs containing phytoestrogens have been used to treat women’s problems, especially the menopause, which results from a drastic decline in estrogen production in an older woman’s body. 

Take hops, for instance. Hops are a traditional remedy for many of the symptoms of the menopause such as hot flushes, night sweats, mood swings and vaginal dryness. In fact, the phytoestrogens in hops are so powerful that there are many anecdotal reports of female hop-pickers experiencing menstrual disturbances simply on account of touching the plant.

Like the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park, this gentleman soon changed gender after touching these hopsSee the source image



If that’s the case, you can well imagine the effects phytoestrogens might have on the hormonal balance of men. At least studies two – here and here – have shown that consumption of hopped beers lowers men’s testosterone.

One phytoestrogen in hops, 8-prenylnaringenin, has been shown to have an estrogenic activity ‘greater than other established plant estrogens,’ through tests on cells from rat uteruses. [R] The study of 8-prenylnaringenin states that although this phytoestrogen can be detected in beer, ‘the levels are low and should not be any cause for concern.’ 

However, more recent research has shown that levels of this chemical can be massively amplified within the body by the body’s own gut flora. Another phytoestrogen in hops, isoxanthohumol, can be converted into 8-prenylnaringenin at up to a 90% rate, as one study showed. [R] This may be one reason why 8-prenylnaringenin can be detected in the urine of beer drinkers for days afterwards: because the body’s gut flora is still continuing to produce it. [R]

More detailed research needs to be done on the hormonal effects of long-term consumption of hopped alcoholic drinks, but the already-existing evidence, including what we know about the estrogenic effects of hops per se, is clear enough that you should give hopped beer a wide berth if you can. It’s worth noting, though, that excessive alcohol consumption in any form has been linked to lower testosterone levels too. At least two studies have shown testosterone decreases in men as a result of alcohol consumption per se [R][R].

Absorption : soyjak

Soyjak drinking his favourite brand of soy milk

Whenever the subject of phytoestrogens is brought up, soy is sure to be mentioned, and with good reason. Just look at our friend Soyjak above, guzzling his favourite brand of soy milk. Scientific research has shown that regular consumption of soy products like edamame, tofu, soy milk and miso may lower testosterone levels, as we’d expect would be the case with a known phytoestrogen.

For example, one study in 35 men found that drinking soy protein isolate for 54 days resulted in lower testosterone levels [R]. As well as lowering testosterone levels, soy consumption has also been found to reduce male fertility [R].

Yesterday, we talked about a shocking study from 2004 that showed that feeding monkeys a diet high in soy isoflavones turned them into aggressive loners

The shocking study which showed massive negative changes to primate behaviour as a result of long-term soy consumption

The study took place over a period of 15 months, and involved feeding different diets to groups of adult male macaques living in nine stable social groups. The diets differed only in terms of the protein source the monkeys received: casein and lactalbumin (no isoflavones), soy protein isolate containing 0.94 mg isoflavones/g protein, and soy protein isolate containing 1.88 mg isoflavones/g protein.

‘In the monkeys fed the higher amount of isoflavones, frequencies of intense aggressive (67% higher) and submissive (203% higher) behavior were elevated relative to monkeys fed the control diet (P‘s < 0.05). In addition, the proportion of time spent by these monkeys in physical contact with other monkeys was reduced by 68%, time spent in proximity to other monkeys was reduced 50%, and time spent alone was increased 30% (P‘s < 0.02).’

This led the authors to conclude that ‘long-term consumption of a diet rich in soy isoflavones can have marked influences on patterns of aggressive and social behavior.’

These effects were almost certainly due to the effects of the soy phytoestrogens on the process of androgen aromatisation, a process which the authors of the study note plays an important role in governing aggressive behaviour. Interestingly enough, a new study on soybean oil, which does not contain phytoestrogenic isoflavones, showed similarly dire mental effects, as well as negative physical effects, when administered to mice. Either way, whether you consume the phytoestrogenic isoflavones or just the oil, it looks like soy is bad news – full stop.

If you’re interested in learning which foods do and don’t contain phytoestrogens, try consulting this list.

Soy

Soy-based products are often promoted as viable replacements for meat sources over environmental and ethical concerns. But it doesn’t end there; soy products have slipped their way into every day food sources and could be having a detrimental impact on a societal scale. Much brouhaha has surrounded these products — but are the alarmists in the wrong?

Although soy is a potent phytoestrogen — something we have written about in the past — it has other deleterious effects besides lowering your testosterone. Drinking a diet of liquid soy will damage your facial physiognomy, and large-scale soy cultivation, despite what the activists for vegetarianism and veganism say, is also massively damaging to the environment.

As noted in our article on 5 Foods That Lower Testosterone:

Scientific research has shown that regular consumption of soy products like edamame, tofu, soy milk and miso may also lower testosterone levels.

For example, one study in 35 men found that drinking soy protein isolate for 54 days resulted in lower testosterone levels [R].

As well as lowering testosterone levels, soy consumption has also been found to reduce male fertility [R].

A Side Note on Popular Anti-Soy Memes

I MUST CONSOOM THE SOY!

No doubt you’re already familiar with the pathetic figure of Soyjak, one of the many variants of the original Wojak meme. You’ll recognise Soyjak by his bald head, wispy beard and glasses. If you don’t encounter him at repose, you’ll probably find him bawling his eyes out over some form of injustice – NOOOO! YOU CAN’T JUST DO X / NOOO! NOT THE HECKIN’ Y! – pointing open-mouthed to a food truck or product billboard some distance away, or holding a new games console in his hand, a post-vasectomy gift from his ‘wife’ perhaps.

An overgrown child with no real preferences or character of his own, Soyjak must consoom an endless succession of corporate products to animate and validate himself and his otherwise entirely empty life. 

The hilarious thing is, of course, that Soyjak really does exist. Like Wojak himself, he is an archetype of a new type of ‘man’, one created by a new type of environment flooded with chemicals and social practices that are toxic to traditional masculinity. In our ongoing series in advance of our book Reclaim Your Masculinity, we’ve been examining a variety of harmful compounds such as phytoestrogens, xenoestrogens and foods that will cause your testosterone levels to sink faster than the new Ghostbusters remake. 

Put simply, Soyjak is what he consumes – nothing more. And, as the name suggests, one thing Soyjak consumes a lot of is soy.  Just what is it about soy that makes it so bad (assuming, that is, that you want to be a red-blooded man and not a simpering, flabby puppet of corporate interests)?

Soy is what is known as a phytoestrogen, a plant product that mimics the effects of the female hormone estrogen in the human body. No wonder, then, that scientific research has shown that regular consumption of soy products like edamame, tofu, soy milk and miso may cause a drop in testosterone levels. For example, one study in 35 men found that drinking soy protein isolate for 54 days resulted in decreased testosterone levels. [R]

As well as lowering testosterone levels, soy consumption has also been found to reduce male fertility.

‘There was an inverse association between soy food intake and sperm concentration that remained significant after accounting for age, abstinence time, body mass index, caffeine and alcohol intake and smoking. In the multivariate-adjusted analyses, men in the highest category of soy food intake had 41 million sperm/ml less than men who did not consume soy foods (95% confidence interval = -74, -8; P, trend = 0.02)…

The inverse relation between soy food intake and sperm concentration was more pronounced in the high end of the distribution (90th and 75th percentile) and among overweight or obese men. Soy food and soy isoflavone intake were unrelated to sperm motility, sperm morphology or ejaculate volume.’ [R]

So not only does consumption of soy reduce your sperm count, but this problem becomes even worse if you’re overweight or obese. It’s worth remembering, as we’ve said elsewhere, that fat tissue itself is estrogenic, and this is probably why being fat compounds the effects of soy on male fertility.

Chet Yorton, one of the few to defeat Arnold in competition : bodybuilding

Chet Yorton used to take soy protein powder in the early days, but then he wasn’t as bombarded with estrogenic chemicals as we are today, nor was he otherwise a vegetarian or vegan

Interestingly enough, soy protein used to be a popular protein powder in the Golden Age of bodybuilding. However, it has since been recognised as an inferior quality protein, with low bioavailability compared to whey and milk and egg proteins.[R

Sorry, vegan gainers: you’d be better off sticking to meat.

OMG! SOYLENT TRUCK! OM NOM NOM

What Has It Got To Do With Your Facial Structure?

When you see or hear the words ‘soy face’, you inevitably think of the hideous, cloying facial expression pulled by Soyjak every time he learns that a new corporate product has dropped for him to consoom. OMG NEW KOREAN KIMCHI SOYLENT MOUTHWASH! GOTTA TAKE A PICTURE OF MYSELF WITH MY MOUTH OPEN! EMOJI EMOJI EMOJI!

The social-psychological aspects of this facial display deserve some comment. It’s long been known that in the chimpanzee world opening one’s mouth and displaying the teeth is essentially a sign of subservience: I am a friend, not a threat. [R] A ‘submissive grin’, as it’s called:

‘The bared-teeth display, also referred to as the fear grin, or grimace, is one of the most conspicuous and well-studied facial expressions in ethology and has been reported in a variety of mammalian species from canids to primates. Research has shown, however, that the communicative function of this expression can differ quite broadly depending on the species, their type of social organization and social context. In wolves, for example, retraction of the lips horizontally over the teeth results in a ‘submissive grin’ which is used by cubs and subordinates when actively greeting adult conspecifics, or humans’ [R]

Why would humans be so different? We are, after all, naked apes, as Desmond Morris put it in his famous 1967 book.

The Naked Ape at 50: 'Its central claim has surely stood the test of time '  | Evolution | The Guardian

Desmond Morris with a baby chimp

Essentially, what Soyjak is saying with his soyface is: I am a good man, not like those other bad men. Because Soyjak has no way of ascending the traditional dominance hierarchy of males, based as it is upon physical dominance, aggression and prowess (but also, let it not be forgotten, cooperation, self-sacrifice and very often serious privation too), he must find another way to get ahead in life. He does so by rendering himself totally harmless, at least ostensibly, and conspiring in the downfall of traditional masculinity.

By doing so he hopes to emerge from the ruins of tradition attractive to the opposite sex – an otherwise impossible task. Funnily enough, though, all this soyfacing and constant declarations of being free from the stain of ‘toxic masculinity’ – ‘I’m with HER!’ / ‘This is what a feminist looks like’ / ‘I voted Hillary’ – don’t make these men immune from the sexual assault accusations that are supposed to be the exclusive province of unreconstructed men – in fact quite the opposite. [R] But that’s a matter for another day…

Nutrition and Physical Degeneration

When I write ‘soy face’ in this context, though, I’m talking about the deleterious effects of liquid soy consumption on the human face. This should hardly be a surprise. Dr Weston A Price, the famous physiologist, wrote about the phenomenon of physical degeneration, especially facial degeneration, in his landmark 1939 study, Nutrition and Physical Degeneration.

Price showed the devastating effects for native populations of the transition from their ancestral diets to the modern, Western diet, especially the introduction of grain consumption for the first time. Where the natives eating their ancestral diets had strong and properly formed jaws, with evenly spaced teeth without decay, the younger generation, now eating a largely imported Western diet, had narrowed faces, malformed dental arches and crowded jaws full of teeth that were crooked as a politician and riddled with decay. 

Why I Base My Health Philosophy on Weston A. Price | Embracing Motherhood

The effects of physical degeneration were shown by Price in a series of photos posing different generations and also siblings against one another. One side illustrates the effects of the native diet, the other those of the modern. 

Mandibular Madness

Part of the problem with these modern diets, as Price recognised, is that they are too soft. Our ancestors would spend hours a day chewing their food – bone, cartilage and connective tissue, tough cuts of meat – as well as using their teeth and jaws for practical tasks like working leather and other handicrafts, whereas we moderns essentially slurp our food.

As well as forgetting how to chew in the first place, many of our foods, especially soft grains, barely require any chewing at all; even our modern meat preferences, for fillet over flank steak say, predispose us to the least amount of chewing possible. And so, as a result, the musculature of the jaw and face do not develop as they should, leading to the effects Price documented.

TMJ DYSFUNCTION OR 100% FUNCTIONAL? - Daniel Baines

The muscles of the jaw involved in chewing

Use it or lose it, or so the saying goes: this is precisely the risk of a liquid diet. If you don’t use the muscles of the jaw for mastication AT ALL, then the muscles aren’t going to stick around. In our ebooks we’re often at pains to emphasise how metabolically expensive the maintenance of muscle tissue is, and it’s for this reason that your body will move to get rid of muscle it feels it doesn’t need.

An essential of the struggle to be muscular, then, is to ‘convince’ your body it needs the extra muscle through the constant targeted application of stress and proper nutrition and recovery.

Doesn’t Just Lower Your Test Levels — You Will Look Less Manly

The effects of an all-liquid diet can be aptly illustrated by the founder of Soylent, Rob Rhinehart. On the left, at an early stage of his journey to the status of a fully automated luxury liquid Redditor, we see that he is still recognisably possessed of a jaw; on the right, further down the line, we see his transition to chinless wonder proceeding at a pace.

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Q & A With Soylent Creator Rob Rhinehart

Rob Rhinehart, founder of soylent, before and after a life of only liquid food

Basically, if you subsist on a liquid diet, you’re doing the opposite of what all those looksmaxxers with their mewing and mastic chewing are doing. If you want to have a jaw, you’re going to have to eat solid food: it’s that simple.

The Legendary Drink is a Concoction of Nutritional No-No’s

It’s worth adding, too, that the nutritional content of Soylent is basically garbage. Although Soylent may have improved on the meal-replacement products of the 1990s, the basic ingredients are as follows:

  • Soy protein isolate
  • High oleic canola oil
  • Maltodextrin
  • Isomaltulose
  • Soluble corn fiber
  • Modified food starch

In my last article, I talked about the evil that is vegetable oil. Well, the entire fat content of Soylent comes courtesy of the truly satanic canola oil, seen here in a ‘high oleic’ version supposed further to con you into believing that it is in fact healthy. Besides the soy content, this is reason enough not to consume Soylent.

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In addition, the general macronutrient balance of Soylent is 1:1:2 for fat, protein and carbs, which is perfectly acceptable if all you’re intending to do is sit at a desk all day, sending passive-aggressive emails to HR. But if you’re an athlete or even just an active person, this won’t do at all and no amount of Soylent shakes will be of benefit to you, beyond providing you with your bare caloric needs – and there is much, much more to being healthy than consuming a set number of calories a day.

At the very least, you’ll have to add other foodstuffs to your diet, meaning you won’t be able to be authentically Reddit. We suggest you don’t buy the stuff in the first place and just try to eat like a human instead. 

A study found that infants on soy formula only have levels of serum estrogens between 13,000-22,000 times greater than infants who were either breast fed or given dairy-based formulas instead [R].

A report from the Swiss Bulletin de L’Office Federal de la Santé Publique found that 100 mg isoflavones in soy protein taken by adult women weighing roughly 60kg would provide the estrogenic equivalent of a birth control pill.

If you were to adjust for weight, bioavailability, and quantity, then the daily average consumption for a baby weighing 6kg would be the estrogenic equivalent of roughly 4-5 birth control pills a day!

Male infants experience a testosterone surge in the first few months of life. It is believed that during this period, the infant will begin to express male characteristics after puberty such as in the development of sexual organs and in physical traits like muscular development or deepening of the voice.

A deficiency of these hormones may cause problems with spatial perception and learning difficulties. Additionally, studies have shown that humans need animal fat for optimal neurological health, in spite of pushes to advance plant-based dietsA vegan diet in children has been shown to leave them with stunted height and weaker bones over their meat-eating peers.

The introduction of strong phytoestrogens may disrupt natural hormonal balances and potentially spell long-lasting ramifications.

Soy isoflavones in soy products can depress thyroid function, causing autoimmune thyroid disease, metabolic disruption, and even cancer [R].

Soy, a well-known anti-nutrient, inhibits the thyroid’s uptake of iodine — important for thyroid function — and spikes thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels to compensate.

Infants consuming soy formula as their only food are exposed to 10 times the levels of isoflavones per kilograms of body weight than the amount shown to cause thyroid suppression in adults after three months of exposure.

Babies were also reportedly more efficient at processing dietary estrogens than adults [R].

Soy Isoflavone consumption, per westonaprice.org (* Assumed 60 kg for adults, 6 kg for infants)

Infants may also suffer from intestinal problems and allergies from consuming soy formulas.

We recommend that you purchase our bundle on nutrition so that you avoid succumbing to prevalent diet fads.

It contains a cookbook, complete illustrated diet planner, and a book on keto. Click here if you wish to improve your diet.

Don’t hesitate to email us at herculeanstrength1@gmail.com for personalized coaching and a client questionnaire if you’d like DEDICATED tailor-made personal training on strength training, building muscle, losing fat, developing athleticism, and more — all to your liking, lifestyle, habits, and taste!

Otherwise, don’t forget to claim your FREE eBook detailing how to lose 20lb of fat while building muscle in 12 weeks! You can claim it here.

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